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Emma Hart: Exhibition Preview

Be one of the first to see Emma Hart’s new exhibition BANGER.

London based artist Emma hart (b.1974, London) makes sculpture, photography, film and installation. Her work is often badly-behaved and messy, challenging assumptions and stereotypes in its quest to be something to which everyone can relate. We are delighted that Hart accepted our invitation to make this, her first exhibition in Scotland, and responded with a body of entirely new work, which we are showing alongside the major recent installation Mamma Mia!, made as part of the Max Mara art Prize for Women which she won in 2016. The exhibition highlights hart’s work with ceramics, a material she turned to in order to find the ‘real’ in art: ‘clay can be an exciting way to talk about chaos … what is immediately important is how personal it is. there’s a very raw direct relationship between the clay and my hands’.

Mamma Mia! is an immersive, beguiling, engulfing installation. You look at it by walking through and around it, looking up into a sequence of large ceramic heads/jugs/lamps which hang from the ceiling, projecting light in speech bubbles onto the floor. the work takes the family as a familiar context: the heads/jugs/lamps hang in family groups, disrupted by slowly moving fans whose blades are metal knives, forks and spoons. the new works use the similarly common ground of the car and urban landscape to look at how we navigate the world and understand ourselves within it, with sculptures that place us and our families in relation to windscreens, road signs, car bonnets and steering wheels.

Exhibition supported by
Henry Moore Foundation Logo

Image credit: Emma Hart, X, 2018 (detail); ceramic, Perspex and steel; approx. 190 x 150 x 70 cm Courtesy the artist and The Sunday Painter, London. Photo: Emma hart
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Exhibition Preview: Lee Lozano, Slip Slide Splice

Exhibition Preview
Lee Lozano Slip Slide Splice
Fri 9 Mar, 6.30–8.30pm. All welcome.

Be one of the first to see The Fruitmarket Gallery’s Spring exhibition by Lee Lozano, who was a major figure in the New York art scene of the 1960s and early 1970s. Lozano made furiously inventive, irreverent and often tiny paintings and drawings; vast, abstracted paintings that sometimes used tools as their starting point; and conceptual works which took the form of instructions: ‘investment piece: be the recipient of a grant. Invest half the money on the stock exchange and hold purchase for a minimum time period of six months’.

These works, called ‘language pieces’ by Lozano, culminated in General Strike Piece (‘gradually but determinedly avoid being present at official or public ‘uptown’ functions or gatherings related to the ‘artworld’’…) and then Dropout Piece which saw Lozano leave New York and the art scene entirely. Her radical approach to art and life, in particular her systematic refusal to engage with the institutions and support structures of the art world, led somewhat inevitably to her work being neglected and becoming much less well known over time. Recently, this has begun to change, and we are proud to make this contribution to the reassessment of Lozano’s work.

This exhibition brings together work from across Lozano’s career. A selection of small paintings from 1962 will be shown alongside a selection of drawings from the same time – metamorphic and mostly frankly rude. Four vast, abstracted paintings will be contextualised both by related drawings and previously unseen notes, instructions and lists. A restaging of Infofictions, the exhibition of language pieces she made in Halifax, Nova Scotia in 1971, a few months before her exit from the artworld, completes the exhibition, drawing visitors into the world of Lozano’s innovative and uncompromising artistic imagination; the world of a supremely talented painter who in the end prioritised thinking over doing.

Image: Lee Lozano No title, c.1962.
© The Estate of Lee Lozano. Courtesy Hauser & Wirth.

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